India Factory Fire 8/2/20

On 9/02/2020, a fire at the Nandan Denim factory in India killed 7 workers (death toll may rise), as workers in the department where the fire struck struggled with ventilation and escaping through the only entry/exit available.

Several companies are named in Nandan Denim’s annual report as brands that supply from the factory. These brands should have been aware of the poor conditions their workers were in, and the fire hazards that resulted in the deaths of those 7 workers.

Below are ways you can get in contact with the brands involved. I’ve tried to make this as easy as possible so literally just control c and control v the stuff and lets seek accountability.

News article:

Fire Kills Seven in Indian Factory that Made Denim for Major US Brands

https://www.thedailystar.net/business/news/denim-factory-fire-leaves-7-dead-india-1866496

Twitter:

A fire in a factory supplying denim for major brands has killed 7 workers, as they struggled to escape. According to an Nandan Denim report, brands affiliated with the factory incl. @zara @Target @RalphLauren @Primark @VFCorp – how was this allowed to happen under you watch?

@zara 7 workers have died following a factory at a fire supplying denim to Zara in India, how was this allowed to happen under your watch and what will you do to support the victims and families of the deceased? 

@Target  7 workers have died following a factory at a fire supplying denim to Target in India, how was this allowed to happen under your watch and what will you do to support the victims and families of the deceased? 

@VFCorp 7 workers have died following a factory at a fire supplying denim to VF Corp in India, how was this allowed to happen under your watch and what will you do to support the victims and families of the deceased? 

@RalphLauren  7 workers have died following a factory at a fire supplying denim to Ralph Lauren in India, how was this allowed to happen under your watch and what will you do to support the victims and families of the deceased?

@Primark 7 workers have died following a factory at a fire supplying denim to Primark in India, how was this allowed to happen under your watch and what will you do to support the victims and families of the deceased? 

Instagram caption template

On 8 February 2020, garment workers at a denim factory were killed in a factory fire in India. The death toll so far is 7. There was little ventilation and workers were unable to escape quickly through the single exit. Brands listed as clients of Nandan Denim include @zara @target @vfcorp @ralphlauren @primark. Time and time again brands have proven their workers’ lives are last on their list of priorities, despite their million dollar profits.

 

 

Fashion Factfiles #3: The Sumangali System

Hey guys, happy February and welcome to another Fashion Factfiles blogpost!

The Fashion Factfiles is where we expose the brutal realities of the garment industry, the side that the big corporations and big names in fashion work hard to hide behind ‘girl power’ tees and ‘look at us recycling omg we do care’ campaigns.

This month we’ll be highlighting an issue that many may not be familiar with, but is absolutely horrific and heartbreaking: the Sumangali System.

WARNING: Content regarding sexual abuse and suicide throughout.

Continue reading “Fashion Factfiles #3: The Sumangali System”

LET’S TALK ABOUT ETHICAL FASHION PLS

Ethical fashion: ‘an approach to the design, sourcing and manufacture of clothing which maximises benefits to people and communities while minimising impact on the environment.’
Ethical Fashion Forum

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(Source: https://airrclothingblog.com/2015/03/06/brand-profile-beaumont-organic-available-at-airr-clothing/)

Wow. Where do I begin?

Actually let me begin with this disclaimer: ANY CRITICISM I MAY MAKE ABOUT CERTAIN SITUATIONS/ORGANISATIONS/GROUPS OF PEOPLE IS NOT AN ATTACK ON THESE PEOPLE AS INDIVIDUALS BUT THE SYSTEM FROM WHICH THEY HAVE DERIVED FROM.

Continue reading “LET’S TALK ABOUT ETHICAL FASHION PLS”

Fashion Factfiles #1: Cotton Farmer Suicides in India

The epidemic of cotton farmer suicides is not a recent thing. Between 1995 and 2013, there is believed to have been 60,750 suicides, meaning an average of 10 farmers taking their own lives every day. Between January and April just this year, Maharashtra, India, reported 852 farmer suicides; an average of seven farmer suicides, reported every single day.

There are several reasons why so many cotton farmers are pushed to the point of ending their lives. However, the majority of these causes, including climate change and lack of micronutrients in the soil, have been exacerbated or caused by a far greater problem farmers are faced with: MONSANTO.

Continue reading “Fashion Factfiles #1: Cotton Farmer Suicides in India”

The Shy Activists- FASHION REVOLUTION

We are nearly at the end of Fashion Revolution Week but Fashion Revolution runs all year long.

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Photography by Rahul Talukder

At the beginning of Fashion Revolution Week Mayisha shared her thoughts and what many of us who see through consumerism feel- “We are all unwillingly complicit in this cycle of exploitation, through a system called ‘fast fashion.” We wear the clothes, we buy the clothes, we ask for them.

Since Rana Plaza collapsed “1,137 have been confirmed dead, with over 200 remaining missing. Tales of workers trapped in the rubble with no choice but to saw their own limbs off to escape, of workers trapped within the collapse for days without food or water, surrounded by dead bodies. Of the families who had to identify their deceased family members, only to find that the bodies had been so deformed by the collapse they were almost  unrecognisable. The suffering of the injured workers who are no longer physically capable of working, plummeting them into further poverty. The orphans who lost either one or both parents. The workers who survived, but must face on going psychological torment, as they return to work in the garment factories.”

Mayisha covers how although there is an improvement, things still haven’t massively improved, and that we can try to make a difference by pressuring our favourite brands to make a change. 

Here’s a link to her blog which is a must read.

WHO MADE MY CLOTHES

Who made my clothes is a campaign to look past the clothes, past the label to the person behind the finished product. Supporters of the campaign taken photos of their item of clothing with the label showing to ask the brand on a social platform- who made their clothes.

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Change is at your fingertips

Although there are many ways to lead a more ethical life in terms of fashion such as:

  • swapshops
  • upcycling
  • recycling
  • ethical shopping

We mustn’t forget the plight of garment workers and the issues they face everyday. Mayisha covers a lot of the terrible conditions that garment workers suffer for example, Bangladeshi garment workers earn the lowest minimum wage in the world and it is nowhere near the living wage. 

We have to show that we are in solidarity with garment workers and we have to hold companies accountable. We also have to hold ourselves accountable. Where there is demand there is supply. Let’s demand transparent and fair supply.

Islam teaches us that “Whosoever of you sees an evil, let him change it with his hand; and if he is not able to do so, then [let him change it] with his tongue; and if he is not able to do so, then with his heart — and that is the weakest of faith.”

Many of us have the power to use our voice and therefore have the responsibility to do so.

One of the easiest ways that you can put pressure on brands is by tweeting them. Fashion Revolution have helpfully made a template for twitter- 

I’m , and I want to thank the people who made my . Hi @[brand], #whomademyclothes? via @Fash_Rev.

Islam teaches that the condition of the people won’t change until the people change. I think this is a really valuable and important message. We shouldn’t expect things to change on their own. 

We should shoulder the responsibility of making the change happen. 

As Mayisha stated in her post, that although she is unsure about how to change the industry she is sure that we need to make our voice heard.

Sources and further reading

http://fashionrevolution.org/get-involved/ways-for-everyone-to-get-involved/

http://www.vogue.co.uk/gallery/rana-plaza-fourth-anniversary-fashion-revolution-week

http://www.thestar.co.uk/business/sheffield-store-gets-behind-ethical-fashion-revolution-1-8517624

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/fashion/style/9-ways-master-eco-conscious-sustainable-dressing-stay-stylish/

https://standup4islam.wordpress.com/2012/12/25/when-you-see-a-wrong-change-it-with-your-hand/

http://ohsoethical.tumblr.com/post/159933245193/fourth-anniversary-of-the-rana-plaza-collapse-my

The Secret Underbelly of the Cambodian Garment Industry

The Secret Underbelly of the Cambodian Garment Industry